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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 69 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >>> first up, spanish economy contracted more than forecast with gdp down 1.8% annually, .7% from the previous quarter. analysts were looking for a smaller 1.7% drop over last year. speaking after the release, the spanish prime minister, mariano rajo, planned to announce new stimulus measures shortly. joining us are sarah perez fruitos, manager at brunswick capital, and sarah foley. add the gdp number to the awful retail sales, forecasts now that spain will still be in contraction in 2014, i don't see how it's at all possible the spanish government is going to meet -- they'll set out revised budget targets. i don't see how they'll meet any of them. >> really, the t's about the figures that we knew this morning. basically because last quarter we have an increase on the vat taxes and really we pass from the bat from 70% four years ago to 21% now in the last quarter. really as you say, the retail -- the consumer has fallen down dramatic. we need to remember that the public employees has cut their extra payment from the christmas extra payment. and this situation with no more extra fo
to see how they characterize the economy, whether they are getting more comfortable with it now that we have the biggest piece of the fiscal cliff out of the way or whether they are still concerned that employment is sluggish an inflation is tracking kind of low. >> yeah. i mean, we have an economic that's improving but not necessarily gangbusters here to necessarily illustrate or justify this huge movement to stocks. ryan dietrich, what's your take on this in terms of technical strategy? what do the charts look like you to? >> we ton to see what's happened this year and see a lot of similars with last year. we rallied virtually 45 degrees until april and seeing a lot of thins. early in the year, a lot of bulls come in, stocks in mutual funds. doesn't mean the market has to peak. a lot of people are saying that. seasonality-wisebrua usually strong when you have a strong january and march and april, the two strongest months the last five years, up 3.5% on afternoon. all in all coupled with the pact that short interest currently on s&p 500 components is actually higher right now and trimm
, minus one, plus one. all that is a power point. our economy is sluggish today, and there's no reason for it. we have a wonderful country. we have great resources, we still have a free world, the opportunity to move forward. here's my message to the leadership in washington, get in the game. >> thank you. >> join us on monday. have a great weekend. "squawk on the street" starts right now. >>> we have breaking news on this jobs friday. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm melissa lee, with carl quintanilla and david faber. we're closing in on 14,000. a leg higher in futures just moments ago. the dow looking at 112 points at the open. the s&p 500 looking at about 11 at the open. of course, this is after the best month for january, since january of 1987. as for the picture over in europe, taking the lead from here in the united states in terms of gains, we do see the cap up by 1.3%, and the dax in germany up .6 of 1%. in asia, the real star is the nikkei, embarking on 12-week winning streak with the yen weakening down to 92 versus the u.s. dollar. of course, the road map here starts wi
in washington are giving us what is good for the economy and that is a on a diet while the private sector continues to grow and when you compare us to the last expansion there were 150,000 private sector jobs added herman in the last expansion and in this expansion there are 200,000. believe it or not washington may be helping us. dagen: if times are so great, why is the ten year treasury below 2% on a yield? why hasn't the bond bear market showed up yet? which you were calling for last march? >> you are right. i got to tell you it has probably more to do with the craziness of central bankers than anything else? i was just in davos last weekend we spent a lot of time talking about the monetary policy, what is going on, how unorthodox this all is. the thing that i said to mark carney of the head of the bank of england was waived lb into uncharted waters and acknowledging we don't know how to get home we decided to sell deeper into uncharted waters. we are setting ourselves up for major problems. the fact that the fed continues to keep interest rates this low especially when i can point to
and fives, i think it's going to cause... have many negative effects on the economy. >> reporter: however, if mortgage rates only move up slightly, that's likely to bring more buyers into the market. that's because many people have been waiting on the sidelines for a signal the housing market has bottomed. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: as home prices have risen, so have the stock prices of many home builders, with the stock prices more vulnerable than the housing market. the yellow line, the year-over-year changes in home prices. the blue line, the home builders' stomach exchange traded fund. they move higher before home prices do, and move lower before the prices crack. megan mcgrath is with us tonight. you've looked at this relationship between the actual price of homes and the home building stocks. what does the rally in home building stocks tell you today about home prices in the month ahead. >> it is certainly telling us investors are expecting prices to continue to go up, and to go up quite a bit. prices as well as volume. there is a relationship there, too. we heard so
. >>> japan's finance minister taro aso pushed his government's big fix for japan's economy at the diet on monday. he told lawmakers the details of the draft supplementary budget worth over $100 billion. the speech marks the start of debate with the opposition bloc over the government's key policy. prime minister shinzo abe has pledged to tackle japan's stubborn deflation and finally trigger economic revival. nhk world reports. >> translator: we must pull the country out of prolonged deflation. we also need to boost employment and income and regain a strong economy. these are the most important challenges facing this cabinet. >> reporter: the abe government is aiming to pass the extra budget this month. they have bundled the extra spending together with a record draft budget for the new fiscal year starting in april. they hope that combined spending of over $1 trillion will jolt the economy back to life. that approach is based on three pillars, bold monetary easing, flexible fiscal policy and a sustainable growth strategy. the diet sessions will deal with the fiscal policy pillar, a hug
. >> and is steady as she goes, the u.s. economy is expected to keep up the recent trend of modesty of unspectacular job growth in january. >>> plus, the dutch finance minister warns of a worsening deficit this year, this after the government is forced to bail out local banks after a bailout of 3.7 million euros. >>> we kick off with the pmis out of the eurozone. january manufacturing pmi, 47.9. the flash 47.5, december manufacturing pmi was 46.1. it has boosted the euro to maintain its gaze, now back over to 1.3651 and continuing to climb high. that is now a 32-month high against the yen, as well, at 11.25965. the german manufacturing pmi was a little better, as well, this morning. helping to boost those numbers. we suggest that there's benefits from emerging markets rather than, perhaps, from elsewhere in europe. anyway, coming in better once again for the eurozone. still in contraction territory, but, of course, the trend is what is being concentrated on. we had similar indicators for two die verging views on china's recovery. eases to 50.4 for january, that was below the forecast of 5079 the. bu
. >> and when you consider what happened is in the german economy in the fourth quarter, the headline gdp figures disappoint and yet the employment data looks okay. >> which is one of those things. we'll cure our eyes on the reaction to that. plenty of news to come, as well. plenty to come on the show. let's remind you what is on today. it's all about financials not just in europe and japan, but in india where the country's biggest lender has just posted number peps we'll be out to mumbai for a breakdown. >>> and what are the traders saying? at 10:45 european time, we'll have our eyes on stocks from the london trading floor. >> other indices around the world posted record indices around the world in january. >> and we'll explain more in a little bit. >>> first, deutsche bank shares are trading higher today after the group reported strong operating performance for its divisions in the fourth quarter, despite posting a heavy loss. the german euro booked a 1 million litigation charge which led to restructuring. in an analyst call, it was said the group does not need to issue more sales but l
in april. >> we do begin with a stunning gdp report. the economy contracted to 0.1% in the fourth quarter. first decline since 2009. this as we remain on dow 14,000 watch. the index is fewer than 46 points away from that mark. which hasn't been reached since october 2007. the dow component boeing rising pre-market. it earned $1.28 a share in the fourth quarter, beating wall street estimates. it expects no significant impact from any faa directives involving its 787 dreamliner, and is maintaining its production and delivery forecast. let's get to the gdp number. it is apparent that the economy came to somewhat of a screeching halt in the last two months of the year. >> i think cnbe played a big role. i'll calis a one off number. the reason i call it a one off number is there are way too many companies who reported during this period that did not see this level up -- well, let's just say no growth whatsoever. >> decline. that being said, it may be a one off, but it's still a bit surprising, if not scary. >> well, does it not say that the fed's been right in what it's been doing. >> it does.
challenges facing the economies of europe, japan, china, and south korea. next on book tv. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> okay. first of all, it is great to be back. we enjoyed our relationship that way. tokyo has been the headquarters of our asia-pacific operations for 25 years now. we enjoy a terrific relationship and a lot of different ways. one of my colleagues who is with me, doug peterson who just joined us from the city, and he is setting up. we welcome you, doug. dougie is all over the world. as such, he has lived quite a bit of time in japan himself. it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see. in terms of this whole notion of the book, by the way, a very modest title, banker to the world. when i heard of this, and i am a very close, personal friend of bill's, like everyone in this room is. and so when he was talking to me about this concept of what he wanted to write about to lessons of debt crises and all of this, i just knew that it was right in our sweet spot, what we needed to the will to do. so we were able to convince them. so no i'm not talking
in this difficult economy you do not cut social security or disability programs. you do not head -- you do not cut medicare or medicaid. if the president were to go forward and say, we are not going to balance the budget on the backs of the most vulnerable, but we are going to look for hundreds of billions of dollars in revenue from those companies that are stashing their money in the cayman islands or bermuda or other tax havens. we are going to take on hard look at all corporate loopholes. we are going to look at the absurdity of continuing to give tax breaks and subsidies to the largest oil companies, who are enormously profitable. the bottom line is the president should be doing -- it is not hard politics. it is what the american people want. they want jobs. they want infrastructure. people want, in terms of deficit reduction, large corporate. these guys on wall street making huge amounts of money. the american people are pretty clear across the political spectrum that they want those to help us through deficit reduction, not elderly people, not children, not sick people. tavis: agree on the a
and this would then depend on the economies of some of these emerging markets remaining stable and growing of course? >> well, there are two forms. there's the high rollers and the mass market. and the mass market is pretty high end. you go into these casinos at nighttime, and it's very hard to find a table under $25. these people like tables. they don't like to play slots. liz: i have to ask, you go there and you look at each of these and you watch the action there, like the james bond movie? >> yeah, i think i've lost my last nine games. very hard to do that. liz: i won't even play the penny slots, forget it. when you were looking because you have been so cautious and so smart with a little luck thrown in, when you're looking to commit money to a certain stock to put in the fund, what are the things you look for? >> we look for basically businesses that grow, especially businesses -- liz: that's quite simple actually. >> businesses that generate cash. we like the cash to come out sometime or another. a good example of a business we don't like is amazon. cash never comes out of the bottom
, it says here? let's get a read on the state of the economy. at least it wasn't a -- that kind of rein. there's three of them. anyway, joining us for the next hour is bob bruska. that's fao -- >> no. you cannot. >> fao economics. as becky said at the top, things are going to go really well or the market is going to have an '87 crash. >> i like the binary outlook. >> everything you said was so good until you gout to that point. >> he usually wears one of these very clever ties. >> i'm not going to give him any -- >> there you go, joe. >> you didn't forget because you are getting up there. >> up there? >> close to his age. >> i have to put it out the night before. >> i lay my clothes out the night before, too. >> do you, really? >> oh, yeah, me, too. well, my wife is sleeping. i have to do that. >> all right. so did you, when you saw the down 0.1, what was your -- did you immediately explain it away? did you express shock, chagrin, angle, denial? >> no, i don't have an ee morm attachment to gdp -- >> you cover it long enough, and i cannot say that i don't have an emotional attachment to
is? but if you want to compete in the local economy you may want to brush up in one of the biggest economies. the u.k.'s next generation may not be able to compete on the global stage because there's not enough schools teaching mandarin chinese. the british council found only 3% of primary and 9% of secondary schools say their schools offer mandarin and china becoming the world's second biggest economy in 2011. so why should we learn this language? some say you are guaranteed a job if you learn it. >> it's what the chinese call chinese rice bowl. if you learn mandarin, you're made for life. i can think of two or three lads i've interviewed in schools in london were literally the age of 17 fighting off u.k. customers. three or four or five fighting off job offers. 150,000 with french and 200 ,000-plus with mandarin. >> you probably can't see these from where you're sitting. tiny things. canadian pennies. say goodbye. tell you about this story. they are getting rid of them. there are 6 billion in circulation but today is the day they are gone. >> thank you. >> well, say with us here
to economies of scale. retirement income options would be current and former employees that have little incentive to do so. our defined contribution system is not perfect, but there's other things to make it substantively better. in conclusion we can increase coverage by creating a low-cost mechanism for small employers can benefit from the east of payroll deduction to fund a retirement savings account. we can encourage employers and ways for higher employer contribution rates. third, we can limit plant them for three can encourage the adoption of annuity options. thank you. >> thank you, dr. madrian. ask around the five-minute questions. i want you to know we are looking at the leakage problem and something i've become more aware of and hopefully this committee will be looking at the shortly. let me ask you -- share this retirement plan, a key open issue is that the contribution rate should be. those who have been working on developing this plan have thought about it not for social security between employer to give you contribution was some low threshold employer match and allowing an
the economy at the european level. there's a trend on twitter tweeting for the -- the contractions for rajoy reject and that's on the right very well the situation here in spain. since the case, the corruption case was reported by the newspaper a few days ago. rajoy lost six points in the opinion polls in approval ratings. he is now amid 24%. that being said, the leader, the socialist leader of the opposition remains in terms of rating. so even if there's a lot of pressure on rajoy, there's now not any alternative in shape. that's the reason why the worry in the market. that's the reason for the decline today on the ibex 35. >> stephane, thanks for that. the bond, is it driven by political uncertainty, of course, but the pmi is up this morning for spain, up 47. but the employment pmi, down to 42 and that's back from the low since this time last year. >> i don't like the numbers. if you'd asked me six months ago, i would have probably said possibility of spanish growth falling off the cliff, low. 10%, maybe. now if you ask me, i'd say low but probably 30% and rising. the markets need to facto
. two wars come to an economy in, traditional alliances fraying, are diplomatic standing damaged, and around the world people questioning america's commitments to core values and their ability to maintain our global leadership. that was my inbox on day one as your secretary of state. today conclave the world remains a dangerous and complicated place and of course we still face many difficult challenges. but a lot has changed in the last four years. under president obama's leadership we have ended the war in iraq, begun a transition in afghanistan and brought osama bin laden to justice. we have also revitalized american diplomacy and strengthen our alliances. and while our economic recovery is not yet complete, we are heading in the right direction. in short, america today is stronger at home and more respected in the world. and our global leadership is on firmer footing than many predicted. to understand what we have been trying to do these last four years, it's helpful to start with some history. last year i was honored to deliver the forest all lecture at the naval academy name
in the economy for the first time since 2009. the s & p 500 is up more than 5% so far this month. very, very strong month. >> what can you say? this is a great bull market. it is. i mean, the averages went up big. transports led us, okay. could we go for a breather? it would make sense, but the fed is not stopping. it's not stopping the fed. >> s & p keeps putting out these historical numbers, a 5% gain in january and years like that, just going back to '50, 1950, 31% for the year, 27, 26, 31, 45. i mean, just -- does this year hold that potential. >> hear siegel this morning, i know there's controversy, even on this deck, about -- >> for the long term. >> he did call the top. >> he loved housing you and -- my god, i'm sorry. >> my dad's building, the society of towers. >> since the last time we had the gapes, '07, 12-month forward pe is 15. back then, it was 9. we are not overpriced necessarily, given the run that we had. >> keeps rates down, competition from bonds, not so great. i still can't get over that they preserve thafd dividend low tax rate these are bond equivalents, a lot of stock
had ended eventually, they will be right. if you keep predicting doom, sooner or later the economy will fall into recession and you will be right. the problem comes into timing. into what could potentially go wrong and how soon that could happen and how pervasive the weakness will be. certainly, you look at what the federal reserve was saying or what the treasury was saying at the time prior to the financial crisis. you know, the question is, do they mislead people? did they have a forecast that was contrary to what was prevailing? those are the questions that need to be answered. forecasting is hazardous. particularly, when it involves predictions about the future. mark twain said that. i do not know that, i do not know that you can make that a crime. connell: we rate every deal. we will see what eric holder has to say in a couple minutes. thank you for coming on. we will talk to you soon. dagen: somebody bought that and they turned blind eye to actually looking at securities in the portfolio. connell: it was was a messy time. dagen: barclays setting up a rainy day fund. more than
say the says holding back the economy, the federal reserve is holding back the economy. >> steve liesman will be along at 7:30 eastern. i don't think he would buy into that. we will be here with the release of cnbc's exclusive fed survey. and from the better late than never file, the senate has approved the long delayed $50.5 billion aid package for the vikt manies of superstorm sandy. the approval comes three months after the storm ravaged the east coast destroying thousands of homes and is business in new york and connecticut and new jersey. nine republicans joined democrats in voting yes on the measure. now president obama must sign it into law, which he is expected to do. senate leaders held up the aid and for wrangling' over the new rules, filibusters and some pork in there and all kinds of stuff. andrew asked me today -- i love this. is it okay to wear a jacket? it's fine to wear a jacket when you want to because of -- he goes, look, this shirt needs a jacket. that begs the question, where do you wear a shirt that needs a jacket to cover it up? >> because it's a different l
anymore. you look at the economy and it looks like the market is taking off. maybe a new sense that the ceo world is figuring out, i'm going to figure it out on my own. >> the hardest thing is that politics and business intersecting doesn't work. they do things for noneconomic reasons. somebody said in europe, they don't care about -- they're going to keep europe together. the u.s., i think entitlement reform is serious. i think they have a couple weeks to work this out. >> barry, thank you so much. it's been a pleasure talking to you today. >> thank you. >> that does it for us today. make sure you join us tomorrow. right now it's time for "squawk on the street." >>> good morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm melissa lee, along with carl quintanilla, jim cramer and david faber at the new york stock exchange. the new home price reports were just released. s&p's david blitzer will join us to break these numbers down moments from now. let's get a check on futures. and how we are setting up, this after the s&p ended its eight-day rally. it managed to hold above the 1,500
have cooled. all of this with a troubled economy at home and calls for a lighter footprint abroad. i'm pleased to have tom donilon back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: we are now into a second term. what do we mean by lighter footprint? >> well, if we step back on that, at the beginning of 2012, the president after a multimonth review, close consultation with the uniformed military, the joint chief, service secretaries and combatant commanders around the world put together a new defense strategy. that defense strategy had to take into account that the budget control act required the defense budget over ot next ten years to be reduced by $500 million or so, a little less than that. and which would require a 5% decrease over what were the plans. and in doing that the president asked the military to think about what the new challenges were going to be. what were the real challenges we were going to face. and that defense strategy was comprehensive. and it had various pieces to it that we would look to agile forces, that we would look to having a global footprint.
policy numbers kick off a two-day meeting today to discuss the economy and, of course, interest rates. where does wall street see the u.s. economy going from where we are today and what are the biggesthrea to the recovery? steve liesman fresh here with the results of the exclusive cnbc survey. take it away. >> really interesting results, tyler. i was not expecting this. one of the most important questions we ask month to month, what is the probability of recession in the next 12 months. you can see on the fiscal cliff debate shot up to 36%, came down during the winter and shot back up as we went back into the fiscal cliff and debt ceiling debate. it's come down markedly, 20.4%. that's the low as long as we've been asking this question and one of the big edrops we've seen. it comes in the next line as growth forecasts are rising. this the tail of the tape of the gdp forecast of our panelist. 52 responded this time around. you can see we started in march a year ago here. 2.74%. it's come down, down, down. it just shot up for the first time. not a big jump from 1.9 to 2.08. where are we
predicted it could harm the economy if the cuts are allowed to kick in. instead of working together to do something about it they resorted to the blame game a month before the deadline. republicans may be the party of spending cuts but on monday house speaker john boehner insisted the looming sequester was the president's idea. >> the president first proposed this sequester in 2011 and insisted that it be part of the debt limit agreement. >> reporter: unless congress acts the package of cuts worth $1.2 trillion will start to kick in march 1st, taking a $55 billion bite out of this year's defense budget and $27 billion from domestic discretionary spending. according to the congressional budget office more than 1 million jobs are at risk. defense secretary leon panetta had this warning. >> we are going to weaken the united states and make it much more difficult to respond to the crisis in europe. >> reporter: the cuts were designed to be so painful they would force congress to come one a smarter way to trim the deficit instead but it didn't happen. house republicans
we have less of it. the might of our military, the size of our economy, the influence of our diplomacy, and the creative energy of our people remains unrifle. no, it is because as the world has changed, so, too, have the levers of power that can most effectively shape international affairs. i have come to think of it like this -- truman and acheson were building the parthenon with classical geometry unclear lines. the colors were a handful of big institutions and alliances dominated by major powers, and that structure delivered unprecedented peace and prosperity. but time takes a toll even on the greatest benefits -- edifice, and we do need a new architecture for a new world. more frank gehry than formal greek. [laughter] think of it. some of his work might appear at first haphazard, but it is highly intentional and sophisticated. where once a few strong columns could hold up the weight of the world, today we need a dynamic mixture of materials and structures. american military and economic strength will remain the foundation of our global leadership, as we saw from the inter
to be an economy of force response. but, you know, first of all, you know, that has always been our -- other than actual the physical defense of the continental united states or the legal united states, you know, that's been our principal security interest ever since before we were a nation. it's clearly a moment in time where the -- and, of course, through history the patterns have gone back and forth between more autocratic and more liberal governments and regimes in that area. and we have a lot of partners with whom we could be working. we have had a, i mean, our model partnership with colombia which, you know, has been a pretty low-level thing, one which the house of representatives has traditionally kept very close tabs on is a model, counterinsurgency partnership. if we had aped that model in some of our middle east engagements, we would have been much better off also today. but it suggests that, um, again -- and it's possible to work with the brazilians, for example. the brazilians were the leading force in the u.n. mission in haiti. so it, some good things have been happening even while t
with the leader of the opposition talked about the economy, he sounds just like an extraordinary undertaker looking forward to a hard one to? does he not accept that you cannot get out of a debt crisis by borrowing more money? >> my honorable friend makes a very good point. the fact is the economy that we inherited was completely unbalanced. it was based on housing but it was based on finance. it was based on government spending and those based on immigration. those were for incredibly unstable pillars for sustained economic growth. what we that it is a major recovery operation. that operation is still underway but you can see in the new jobs created in the private sector businesses that are expanding them into new people signing up the businesses we are making progress. >> george galloway. [shouting] >> following yesterday's announcement, will the prime minister -- [inaudible] the key differences between the and chopping, crosscutting jihadists, fighting a dictatorship and valley that we are announced to kill, and the equally bloodthirsty jihadists that we're giving money, material, politi
. president obama shifting focus back to the economy after encouraging economic news friday. >> home prices are starting to climb again and car sales at a five-year high. manufacturing is roaring back. the business created 2.2 million jobs last year and our economy created more jobs than econom t economists originally thought. >> jones industrial average closed about 14,000 on friday, the highest since 2007. the los angeles mayor has put an end to speculation that he will be joining the obama cabinet. there is talk he might be transportation secretary. he said he will finish out his term as mayor. in massachusetts, former senator scott brown said he will not be running for the senate seat vacated by john kerry, but there is speculation that brown could have his eye on the governor's seat when patrick steps down in 2014. we will take you to boston to big deeper into that story later in the show. a whole lot to get to first. vice president biden is in germany and talking international security with diplomats from around the globe. in his speech earlier he called the president a tyrant and sa
it in our economy. this is a first and foremost an economic imperative. many republicans know and see that. we would provide the marketplace with education materials so that people understand this is the right thing to do. we have agreed we're not going to put people on buses and 747's. we're also not going to say, this is a passport for everybody. we know the solution is in the middle. that is what we have to work on. rejecting a notion because of a lack of conviction for immigration is going to make matters worse. we have a disadvantage versus canada and australia. they have updated their system. hours dates back to the 1950's, 1960's, 1970's, and 1980's. host: to take a super pac aimed at electing republicans dedicated to reforming immigration. let's go to the phones. caller: good morning. i would like to set the record straight. there are not 11 million illegal aliens in this country. there were more like 26 million. obama wants to extend the invitation to come there to these people's families. we could end up with 35 million people. 70% of the people are from mexico and south america.
. that was way before the economy went into freefall, so he had a couple other priorities he had to deal with when he first came into office. and the third thing, erin, is that this president wants this as his legacy. and he has said that he wants it to be a priority, even during the re-electiore-election, he tt this, so he knows that now he has a debt to pay. the republicans need to do this as a necessity, and with all due respect to the congressman, this is absolutely an issue of electoral survival for the republican party. the congressman is right that this isn't the only thing that republicans need to soften up their tone on, but if this isn't something they get done for the latino community, they're not going to listen to them on anything else. >> congressman, here is my problem intellec chatually from where you're coming from. and this is a complicated issue, but i don't understand. these people are already here. you're not going to be able to pick them up and move them out. that's not practical. so if you start from that point of view, how are you ever going to get a deal? >> if i
to emerging markets and natural resources but japan's sluggish economy forced its leaders to cut oda. they slashed it to less than half of what it was at its peak in the 1990s. however, they're determined to maintain a presence so they've come up with a new strategy. nhk world explains. >> reporter: senegal, western africa. for years, a japanese government agency called the japan international cooperation agency, has provided aid to the country. last year in this village, japan installed a system to purify water. the program helped. the system uses water. even though this is a project, a private company does the filtering free of charge. >> tasty. >> translator: now we don't get sick after drinking water. >> reporter: at the moment, the group is working on the aid project with private companies. until recently, the agency planned the projects. then it commissioned private companies to carry them out. but the japanese government pays the bill. under the new system, it's the company that does all the planning. jica pays up to $560,000 in research fees. the other company pace the costs.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 69 (some duplicates have been removed)